Classical Music Thread
#1
Hi! I know a lot of people aren't very interested in classical music, but don't give it a try. They tend to hear the same boring repertoire over and over again, and this has made classical music lose popularity. So, to spread my love of classical music (of the baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary eras) I thought I would create a thread where I will suggest a piece of music once every week. I will give a bit of information about the piece, and about the composer. Keep in mind that I do this to help myself get into the proper mindset for the work I'll have to do in getting my degree, and that I tend to favour the romantic period of music. So you know, I do this mostly for myself, but if anyone enjoys classical music and has an open mind, I hope this will help.

So for this week, I am going to share with you all a piece for solo violin and orchestra entitled Poème by French composer Ernest Chausson. It was written in 1896 in Florence (where Chausson was holidaying) for the violinist and composer Eugène Ysaÿe. This was written to go along with a story ("The Song of Love Triumphant" which is a short story by Russian writer Ivan Turgenev) of two best friends who fall in love with the same girl. One friend being a blonde painter, and the other being a musician. The girl falls for the painter, and the rejected musician travels the world. He travels the orient and india, and learns to play a piece of music known as "the Song of Love Triumphant" on a patterned violin he got in India. This piece is then played by the musician and has a supernatural effect on himself and the girl. They both share the same dream and sleepwalk into the garden of the Painter's estate (where the musician was staying) but the painter follows them and stabs the musician, who was once his best friend.

The recording is by Itzhak Perlman who is probably my favourite living violinist.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPLHk42PfsI
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The following 4 users say Thank You to Jerk [TC] for this post:
  • Daisies, Captain Hammer =[TC]=, Hugh Jass [T, Axlei [T]
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#2
+1 for dedication if you can keep it up, I'm always up for new music and in this case older music.
"Semper Ardens"

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#3
+1 growing up my parents played classic music around the house/ car, wasnt a lot but Ive learned to appreciate it's subtlety. d-(^.^)z

Also I have no idea how to describe my taste for classic but I usually enjoy the "darker" stuff?

Danse Macabre for four bass clarinets: Edmund Welles live
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pshc3VbRB1c

Penderecki: Symphony No. 7 'Seven Gates of Jerusalem'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaGqGEr2-dE
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#4
there are things this music does to me, and I can't get enough:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFPjFjUonX8

I'm really picky about this one; nobody ever - EVER - plays it slowly enough at certain points...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ho9rZjlsyYY

...and then again, 'classical' kinda blew my mind a young age anyways...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D--qSD01VRA
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#5
Yes, I do love classical music
...Of course you would choose a violin piece hahaha
Quite recently I got to experience a Tchaikovsky symphony, of which included Symphony No. 6, Pathetique. The anguish which is  represented in the song is intense, and brilliantly displays changes in emotion through interchanges between the brass and string sections. It truly shows the emotions Tchaikovsky was feeling while composing the piece.
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#6
Well, I'm really happy that there are classical music lovers here. I know all those pieces inside and out, especially the rite of spring. I have the score on my desk. Tchaikovsky is one of my favourite composers too. Phillip Glass always entertains me, and danse macabre I've played a few times. About me choosing to introduce a violin piece, I'll choose a non solo violin piece next week darnit, and one that's "dark" enough for Hugh, hopefully. See I want to do this weekly so I can think of some things to say about the music and about the composers, and so I don't flood the forums with classical music too much. I've truthfully never fully listened to that Symphony no. 7 by Penderecki until today, thanks Hugh.
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#7
NEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEERD
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#8
Seriously though, Vanilla Ice's Ice Ice baby is the only classical song I know.  51 *M'Lady*
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#9
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtj300j129k
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#10
Hey again! To keep up my promise, I am going to share some darker classical music. This week, i'll be sharing two string quartets which are among my favourite to play and listen to. The pieces are from the romantic and contemporary eras of music respectively. The first is Mendelssohn's opus 80, his string quartet in F minor. String quartets written in minor keys often end in major to grasp some sort of catharsis from the listener. Not with this one, it remains dark and heavy until the final note. Mendelssohn wrote this quartet after his sister (who he loved very much) named Fanny died. It was one of his last works, written in the last few months of his life. He mourned the loss so heavily, it was suggested to him to travel to and relax in switzerland, where he wrote this demanding and lamenting quartet. Many people know it as "the quartet for fanny", and I have never heard another quartet that matches the sadness and anger of this piece.

https://youtu.be/3KVuawa1EDo

The second quartet is written by russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich. It is his quartet number 8 in C minor, opus 110. It is the most popular of Shostakovich's quartets, and for good reason. The movements are all attacca (meaning there is no break between movements) and have a similar sense of foreboding to them as Mendelssohn's work. While sharing some of the same emotions, Shostakovich took anger and hysteria between melancholy to the extremes. Shostakovich was composing during the soviet union's command of Russia. Earlier in his career he was censored and forced to write positive faked patriotic music for his captors. Eventually he swayed them by showing his immense talent for contemporary musical writing styles. Having played this quartet, we were told by our instructor to imagine Jewish prisoners of war in concentration camps being forced to dance for the Nazis while playing certain parts of this quartet. I imagine you'll be able to figure out where.

https://youtu.be/-0nKJoZY64A

I hope you all enjoy even if this week is a little dark, and sorry for suggesting another two pieces with violins in them, it's what I know best. I will probably try to suggest different types of ensembles in constant variation.
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#11


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#12


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#13
I'm a big fan of Vivaldi
if this even counts
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#14
(07-12-2016, 05:05 PM)Gone forever Wrote: I'm a big fan of Vivaldi
if this even counts
Bruv that baroque...
xD
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#15
Because I'm lazy and have been away: I've let this thread get somewhat lost. Today I will try to rectify that by sharing two string quartets which I am about to perform in 2 weeks. The first is by Antonin Dvorak, who moved from the Czech Republic to America in his mid life. The piece is entitled the Dvorak "American" quartet, and draws complete inspiration from his journey to and impressions of America.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b_rwtDlUXA

The second quartet is by Franz Schubert, and was his testament to death. He wrote this quartet upon learning of his impending demise to illness. The name comes from the "Der Tod und das Madchen", a poem by Matthias Claudius. The poem reads as follows (it's a lot better in German, I imagine):

The Maiden:
     Oh! leave me! Prithee, leave me! thou grisly man of bone!
     For life is sweet, is pleasant.
     Go! leave me now alone!
     Go! leave me now alone!

Death:
     Give me thy hand, oh! maiden fair to see,
     For I'm a friend, hath ne'er distress'd thee.
     Take courage now, and very soon
     Within mine arms shalt softly rest thee!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udeeqbCI9mM
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#16
damn jerk.
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#17
Pretty cool,+0 for now
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#18
I often need back-round music for my Advanced multi media productions class in school and this thread has been a god send.
k
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#19
This is what I listen to when studying or doing homework. Only a couple songs in this that I am not a huge fan of, but I really love Hungarian Rhapsody No.2 at just over the 2 hour mark.
Best of Classical Music Compilation
"The alien mothership! If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate." - Zapp Branigan
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